Jubilee Summer Book Club

reading-list

Looking for something to read this summer?

As our Jubilee college students finished up a school years worth of required readings, many of them sent us emails asking if – now that they have time to read something something for pleasure – there were any books they would recommend.

Here’s what we suggested:

Making Sense of the Bible by Adam Hamilton

The world’s bestselling, most-read, and most-loved book is also one of the most confusing.  Mark will be preaching out of this book in July, and it does a great job of giving historical context and different lenses for how to look at scripture, as well as giving biblical interpretations of some key hot-topic issues.

Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller

“I never liked jazz music because jazz music doesn’t resolve. I used to not like God because God didn’t resolve. But that was before any of this happened.” In Donald Miller’s early years, he was vaguely familiar with a distant God. But when he came to know Jesus Christ, he pursued the Christian life with great zeal. Within a few years he had a successful ministry that ultimately left him feeling empty, burned out, and, once again, far away from God. In this intimate, soul-searching account, Miller describes his remarkable journey back to a culturally relevant, infinitely loving God. For anyone wondering if the Christian faith is still relevant in a postmodern culture.

Traveling Mercies by Anne Lamott

Lamott’s faith isn’t about easy answers, which is part of what endears her to believers as well as nonbelievers. Against all odds, she came to believe in God and then, even more miraculously, in herself. As she puts it, “My coming to faith did not start with a leap but rather a series of staggers.” At once tough, personal, affectionate, wise, and very funny, Traveling Mercies tells in exuberant detail how Anne Lamott learned to shine the light of faith on the darkest part of ordinary life, exposing surprising pockets of meaning and hope.

Prototype by Jonathan Martin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13vbg-yrqws

Jesus is God and we are not. Most of us get that. But what we don’t always understand is that God loves us just as much as He does His son. Many times in the Old Testament, God refers to human beings as His “beloved.” But when God called Jesus His beloved, Jesus did something truly remarkable: He believed Him. He lived every moment of His life fully convinced of His identity. And unlike every other person in history . . . He never forgot. 
In Prototype, Jonathan Martin creates a vivid understanding of what it means to be beloved by God. To completely trust, as Jesus did, that God loves you. To live life without fear, confident in your identity and purpose. To handle life’s wounds as Jesus did, and to wake every day with a deep awareness of God’s presence.

Luke for Everyone by Tom Wright (NT Wright)

This is a great book/series for daily devotionals. Tom Wright’s guide to Luke, which includes a wealth of information and background detail, provides real insights for our understanding of the story of Jesus and its implications for the reader. His clear style is accessible for new readers of the Bible, as well as to those who are further on. His exciting new translation of the biblical text brings to life, passage by passage, the immediacy and drama of Luke’s Gospel.

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